Ten years ago, the EU and its Member States jointly made a policy statement (“The European Consensus on Development”) that committed the EU to eradicating poverty and building a fairer and more stable world. Since then, the world has gotten more complex, connected and contested. And the global framework for sustainable development has also undergone profound changes. Development issues are today becoming ever more closely intertwined with climate change and security issues, as demonstrated by the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) which were adopted in 2015 by the United Nations. There has also been a series of consensus-building international conferences, on disasters, financing for development, climate change and humanitarian issues. And the European Union itself has experienced a decade of transformation.

The past decade has witnessed times of existential crisis: the world is getting more complex, connected and contested. In a changing world, the EU has to change its development policy framework. For what priorities? With what means?

 

  • Neven Mimica (European Commission), Commissioner, International Cooperation and Development
  • Gaël Giraud (AFD), Chief Economist
  • Klaus Rudischhauser (European Commission), DEVCO, Deputy-Director General
  • Federico Bonaglia (OECD), Development Centre, Deputy Director
  • Teresa Ribera (IDDRI), Director and moderator of the panel

 

Ten years ago, the EU and its Member States jointly made a policy statement (“The European Consensus on Development”) that committed the EU to eradicating poverty and building a fairer and more stable world. Since then, the world has gotten more complex, connected and contested. And the global framework for sustainable development has also undergone profound changes. Development issues are today becoming ever more closely intertwined with climate change and security issues, as demonstrated by the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) which were adopted in 2015 by the United Nations. There has also been a series of consensus-building international conferences, on disasters, financing for development, climate change and humanitarian issues. And the European Union itself has experienced a decade of transformation.

These fundamental changes need to be reflected in the EU development policy. A new European Consensus on Development is about to be laid out by EU institutions, drawing on the outcomes of an open public consultation. Will EU development policy necessarily focus more on poorer countries and on the immediate neighbourhood, for example? Will it have to spend more on humanitarian assistance? What are the conceivable sustainable development pathways in vulnerable poor countries? How can EU development policy address climate change and green energy? These are some of the important questions for the new European Consensus on Development and for the review of financial instruments in 2017.

The conference will provide the opportunity for policymakers, civil society, and academia to debate on and map out the possible options for updating EU development policy so as to meet the challenges of our time.

It will gather five high-level policy makers and experts. Neven Mimica (European Commission, Commissioner for International Cooperation and Development) will introduce the debate with a keynote speech on the revision of EU development policy. Then Gaël Giraud (AFD, chief economist), Klaus Rudischhauser (European Commission, DEVCO, Deputy director general), Federico Bonaglia (OECD, Deputy director, Development Centre) and Teresa Ribera (IDDRI, director, and moderator of the panel) will provide their vision of possible options the EU and EU member states should contemplate in updating the Development Consensus so as to meet the challenges of our time.

 

 

idmg-ferdi

An event in the framework of the Initiative for Development and Global Governance.

 

 

The future of EU development policy

Date

Monday 24 October 2016

Hour

10:30 - 12:30

Place

Sciences Po
27, rue Saint Guillaume
75006 Paris

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