Jean-Bernard Véron

Chairman of the Fondation de France’s French Committee for International Solidarity

5 published articles

Agence Française de Développement
5, Rue Roland Barthes
75598 Paris Cedex 12

+33 1 53 44 31 31

Biography

Jean-Bernard Véron is currently Chairman of the Fondation de France’s French Committee for International Solidarity and Editor-in-chief of the review Afrique Contemporaine.

Most of his professional career has been spent at Agence Française de Développement, where he held the positions of:
•    Officer at the Brazzaville agency
•    Officer in the Economic Studies Division
•    Geographical Officer for Mali, Burkina Faso, Guinea
•    Geographical Officer for Madagascar, Somalia, Djibouti
•    Officer in the Macroeconomic Studies Division
•    Head of the Macroeconomic Studies Division
•    Head of the Agricultural and Rural Development Division for Central, Eastern and Southern Africa
•    Director of the Asia, Caribbean, Pacific Department
•    Head of the Crisis Prevention and Post-conflict Unit

Jean-Bernard Véron graduated from the Paris Institute of Political Science (International Relations Section). He holds a DEA post-graduate diploma in Economics and a DEA post-graduate diploma in political science, as well as degrees in History, Geography, Anthropology and American Literature.

ID4D Articles

Tribune

The fight against plant drugs : between repression and development

How to fight against the cultivation, commerce and consumption of plant drugs? The focus on development to fight against the cultivation of opiates in Thailand proved to be more efficient than repression-based strategies.

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Tribune

Haiti: Linking up local resourcefulness and development assistance

Is Haiti a cursed country? We could believe so five years after the January 2010 earthquake, which cost the lives of 250,000 people and forced over a million to live under the tents of refugee camps. Humanitarian aid has certainly alleviated suffering, but these same ills that plagued Haiti before this disaster remain very present today. It is what we call underdevelopment. Consequently, the issue today is firstly to rebuild what the earthquake demolished and, secondly, initiate a dynamic for economic growth.

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